Posted on October 26, 2011 by Naomi Finseth

Dr. Heikki Nuorteva, Senior Research Scientist, Finnish Forest Research Institute will present a seminar on Thursday, November 3 2011 at 12.30 p.m. in the Wyatt Lecture Room (236 Earth Sciences Building) University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. Abstract: Finland is located between the Arctic, central European and northern European provinces of the Circumboreal Region within the …

Dr. Heikki Nuorteva, Senior Research Scientist, Finnish Forest Research Institute will present a seminar on Thursday, November 3 2011 at 12.30 p.m. in the Wyatt Lecture Room (236 Earth Sciences Building) University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.

Abstract: Finland is located between the Arctic, central European and northern European provinces of the Circumboreal Region within the Boreal Kingdom. It is divided into three distinct ecoregions: the Scandinavian and Russian taiga, Sarmatic mixed forests, and Scandinavian Montane Birch forest and grasslands. The Finnish landscape is covered mostly (75% of land area) by coniferous taiga forests and fens, with little arable land. Of coniferous forests, 23 million hectares (about 35 % of Alberta) consist of few species of conifers (such as Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris and Norway spruce, Picea abies) and hardwood species (such as Birch, Betula sp. and poplars, Populus sp.). The annual growth of these forests is about 100 million m3, loggings 60 million m3 and the value of global exports of forest industry over 11 billion CAD (2009). There are a number of abiotical and biotical factors threatening to the existence of these taiga forests in Finland. For example in 2010 only wind storms alone felled over 8 million m3 (over 13% of annual loggings) of trees, and the root rot fungi cause annual losses of nearly 60 million CAD. In my presentation, I will highlight some of the important abiotic and biotic factors affecting Finland forests and discuss their impact on forest resources and recreation. Due to their unprecedented impact, the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry is currently renewing the legislation to control the pests and their impact. The Forest Damage Prevention Act restricts the storage of coniferous timber in forests in the summer. The damaged coniferous trees must also be removed from the forest whenever their amount exceeds a certain minimum. The new law will be presented to the Finnish Government at the end of this year.

Event Website: http://www.ales.ualberta.ca/rr/SeminarsandLecture /RenewableResourcesSeminarSeries.aspx

Date and Time: Thursday, November 03, 2011 – 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Contact Information: Department of Renewable Resources Seminar Series Coordinator: Dr Francis C Yeh, 805 General Services Building; Phone (780) 492 – 8882; francis.yeh@ualberta.ca

 


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