Posted on February 21, 2012 by Naomi Finseth

Canada is a state blessed with the world’s largest supplies of fresh water. While other natural resources (oil, grain, timber) figure largely in Canada’s economic and international profile, water is rapidly becoming recognized as a core of these other resource-based industries, and a resource that is increasingly challenged both in terms of supply and quality.

This is particularly true in the western province of Alberta, a province where the combination of climate, geography, hydrology, regulatory politics, economic development, and corresponding population growth make the concept of “peak water” more than just a rhetorical tool. Alberta is already a land with a history of significant drought and variation of supply with important challenges ahead. Dr. Hallstrom will discuss how the factors noted above are increasingly converging upon water as a critical challenge in the province, and the importance of water as a core element of sustainable development.

with

Dr. Lars K. Hallstrom
Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Alberta
Director, Alberta Centre for Sustainable Rural Communities

and discussant:

Betsy Otto
Aqueduct Director, World Resources Institute
Vice President of Strategic Partnerships, American Rivers

Canada is a state blessed with the world’s largest supplies of fresh water. While other natural resources (oil, grain, timber) figure largely in Canada’s economic and international profile, water is rapidly becoming recognized as a core of these other resource-based industries, and a resource that is increasingly challenged both in terms of supply and quality.

This is particularly true in the western province of Alberta, a province where the combination of climate, geography, hydrology, regulatory politics, economic development, and corresponding population growth make the concept of “peak water” more than just a rhetorical tool. Alberta is already a land with a history of significant drought and variation of supply with important challenges ahead. Dr. Hallstrom will discuss how the factors noted above are increasingly converging upon water as a critical challenge in the province, and the importance of water as a core element of sustainable development.

Monday, February 27, 2012
10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
5th floor conference room

Please allow extra time to enter the building. A photo ID is required for entry.
Directions at www.WilsonCenter.org/directions

RSVP to Canada@wilsoncenter.org or (202) 691-4301
Limited Seating Available

Location:
5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

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