Posted on November 19, 2012 by Christopher Thrall

The Augustana Choir, Sangkor, and Mannskor will explore the symbolic nature of mid-winter and the solstice, darkness and light, through choral works drawn from the Medieval era to the 21st century.

As the longest night of the year draws close, and as candles are lit throughout the Advent season, the sense of anticipation is palpable. We eagerly await the return of the sun, warmth, light, and our traditional celebrations which mark the birth of Christ.

The Augustana Choir, Mannskor: Augustana’s Men’s Choir, and Sangkor: Augustana’s Women’s Choir warmly invite you to Lux! – a choral concert designed to explore the theme of light and darkness in relation to the season of Advent and the winter solstice.

The word “lux” is the Latin word for “light”. Through song, Lux! will examine the symbolic and sacred nature of light and darkness from pre-Christian times to the present day with connections made to ancient Aztec folk tradition, Greek mythology, Biblical texts, astronomy, physics, and illuminated, visual representation of sound. From chant to gospel, and from the Medieval era to the 21st century, glorious secular and sacred choral works will be performed in the warm and atmospheric setting of Augustana’s Faith & Life Chapel.

Featured composers include Lauridsen, Augustana Professor Emeritus James Neff, Phillip Nicolai, Obrecht, Persichetti, Pinkham, Praetorius, Tallis, Thompson, Vaughan Williams, Victoria, Washburn, Whitacre, and Willan.

Please join The Augustana Choir and Mannskor, directed by Dr. Ardelle Ries, Sangkor, directed by Dr. John Wiebe, pianists, Dr. Roger Admiral, Elizabeth Clarke, Carolyn Olson, Trevor Sanders (lute), and Katrina Lexvold (organ) for a concert that will bring light to your darkness.

Saturday, December 1 (8:00 pm) or the afternoon of December 2 (3:00 pm). Tickets are available at the door ($18 adults/$14 students/serniors/$45 family). Donations to the Camrose Foodbank are graciously welcomed.


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