Posted on January 16, 2015 by Tia Lalani

Tuesday March 3, 2015 12:00 noon, Roger Epp Room Dr. Glynnis Hood, Associate Professor of Environmental Science & Studies Dr. David “Doc” Larson, Professor Emeritus Beavers are the well-known “engineers” of the ecological landscape and their presence can result in significant increases in biodiversity. However, much of the research regarding the association between beavers and …

Tuesday March 3, 2015
12:00 noon, Roger Epp Room
Dr. Glynnis Hood, Associate Professor of Environmental Science & Studies
Dr. David “Doc” Larson, Professor Emeritus

bvr7Beavers are the well-known “engineers” of the ecological landscape and their presence can result in significant increases in biodiversity.

However, much of the research regarding the association between beavers and biodiversity is conducted in areas where beavers dam streams and create previously absent wetland ecosystems. In our research on isolated wetlands, we found that the channel is mightier than the dam. Beaver channels not only focus water into wetlands, even during times of drought, they act as hunting hotspots for various invertebrate predators and create unique travel corridors between boreal ecosystems.

This new approach to studying beaver-modified wetlands has implications for how we view the tiniest organism to landscape-level ecological connectivity.

Please register with Deb at olafson@ualberta.ca by Friday, February 20.

Free session, free lunch for students who register. $5 Lunch available for all others with registration.


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