Posted on February 16, 2017 by Chester Ronning Centre

Join us on Tuesday, March 7th, at 12:30 pm in the Wahkohtowin Lodge classroom (Forum, lower level) for Ask the Animals: Nature and Theodicy in the Book of Job, a lecture by Visiting Fellow Dr. Brian Doak. No RSVP needed. This lecture is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. See the attached poster …

Join us on Tuesday, March 7th, at 12:30 pm in the Wahkohtowin Lodge classroom (Forum, lower level) for Ask the Animals: Nature and Theodicy in the Book of Job, a lecture by Visiting Fellow Dr. Brian Doak.

No RSVP needed. This lecture is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. See the attached poster for event details!

Brian Doak (PhD, Harvard University) is Associate Professor of Biblical Studies and Faculty Fellow in the William Penn Honors Program at George Fox University, just outside of Portland, Oregon. He is the recipient of the Aviram Prize for archaeological research (2012) as well as the George Fox University Undergraduate Researcher of the Year (2014). He is the author of three books—Phoenician Aniconism in its Mediterranean and Ancient Near Eastern Contexts (SBL Press, 2015); Consider Leviathan: Narratives of Nature and the Self in Job (Fortress, 2014); The Last of the Rephaim: Conquest and Cataclysm in the Heroic Ages of Ancient Israel (Ilex Foundation/Harvard University Press, 2012). He lives just outside of Portland, Oregon, with his wife and two daughters.

Lecture description: The book of Job has long been one of the most provocative and difficult books in the Bible. In this lecture, Dr. Brian Doak will share from his recent book Consider Leviathan: Narratives of Nature and the Self in the Book of Job (Fortress Press). Why does the book of Job engage with the topic of the natural world to the degree that it does—more than any other book in the Hebrew Bible? How might Job have functioned in its historical context as an explanation for God’s justice in the world (theodicy) in light of the violence apparent in the created order? And how might readers today engage with Job to think about the human place within the natural world?

 


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