Posted on July 5, 2017 by Tia Lalani

Join us on September 14, 2017, in the Roger Epp Conference Room at noon for a Lunch & Learn with Patrick Hart on the case of Wall v the Judicial Committee of the Highwood Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses. This lecture will grapple with the question of whether or not judicial interference in religious affairs is warranted. …

Join us on September 14, 2017, in the Roger Epp Conference Room at noon for a Lunch & Learn with Patrick Hart on the case of Wall v the Judicial Committee of the Highwood Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses. This lecture will grapple with the question of whether or not judicial interference in religious affairs is warranted. A $5 lunch is available upon request, register with Deb at augalum@ualberta.ca or (780) 679-1626.

Justice for (W)all?: Judicial Interference in Religious Decisions and the case of Wall v Judicial Committee of the Highwood Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses.

In a 2016 ruling, Wall v Judicial Committee of the Highwood Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses, the Alberta Court of Appeal affirmed that the judiciary could review a religious tribunal’s decision to expel one of its members. But on April 13, 2017, the Supreme Court granted leave to hear this case, meaning that the final ruling in this matter has yet to be delivered. The ramifications of this ruling will be rather significant, particularly in terms of how the Supreme Court ultimately addresses a pivotal question: in what circumstances is judicial interference in religious affairs warranted? In my view, the court’s approach to such a question must involve very careful deliberation, given the judiciary’s general reticence to involve itself in religious disputes – for as former Supreme Court Justice Frank Iacobucci once stated, “judicial determinations of theological or religious disputes, or of contentious matters of religious doctrine, unjustifiably entangle the court in the affairs of religion.”

Patrick Hart is a civil litigation lawyer practicing at Jackie Handerek & Forester in Leduc, and is a PhD candidate in Religious Studies at the University of Alberta.

This lecture is a partnership between the Augustana Alumni Office and the the Chester Ronning Centre.


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