Posted on March 1, 2019 by Tia Lalani

Join Augustana professors Brandon Alakas (English), Greg King (environmental science) and Tom Terzin (biology) for a lunchtime colloquium. See below for lecture abstracts. Friday, March 22 12:15 pm Roger Epp Conference Room, Forum, Augustana Campus Dessert and beverages will be served. This event is free and open to the public, no need to RSVP.  Nuns …

Join Augustana professors Brandon Alakas (English), Greg King (environmental science) and Tom Terzin (biology) for a lunchtime colloquium. See below for lecture abstracts.


Friday, March 22

12:15 pm

Roger Epp Conference Room, Forum, Augustana Campus

Dessert and beverages will be served. This event is free and open to the public, no need to RSVP. 


Nuns on the Run: A Looking Glace for the Religious and the Preservation of the Birgittine Community of Syon Abbey – Brandon Alakas

This lecture will discuss the ways in which vernacular translation was adapted for and exploited by the community of nuns at Syon Abbey who were forced outside the confines of their enclosure during the Dissolution but sought to maintain and rearticulate their distinctive English Birgittine identity. Central to my investigation of this tumultuous period for the Birgittine sisters is A Looking Glace for the Religious, an anonymous manuscript translation of the Speculum Monachorum that belonged to nuns. I will draw on recent discussions of vernacular translations of devotional literature in the sixteenth and seventeenth century by Jamie Goodrich, Marie-Louise Coolahan and Jenna Lay to read A Looking Glace as a nuanced reconsideration of religious identity that shifts emphasis away from external protocols of observation to the individual’s interior disposition and personal relationship with the divine.

 

 

Changes in vegetation productivity across the Bathurst caribou range as measured from satellite imagery and field sampling – Greg King

Rapid change in vegetation structure, composition and growth across subarctic and boreal terrestrial environments may play a role in rapid population declines of barren-ground caribou. The productivity of tundra and boreal forest vegetation has undergone rapid change in recent decades. Increases in vegetation productivity (“greening”) are occurring mainly on the tundra and have frequently been attributed to an increase in shrubs, while decreases (“browning”) are often attributed to drought-related plant stress and have been observed primarily in the boreal forest. The purpose of this project is to map and analyze these types of changes across the entire range of the Bathurst caribou herd and to identify linkages between these changes and significant shifts in herd distribution and habitat use during the same period.

 

 

Discovery of new beetle species during a volcanic eruption in the Philippines – Tom Terzin

Kanlaon Volcano in the Philippines, erupted at 6:20 pm on March 29, 2016. I happened to be four kilometres away from the crater when the eruption occurred. The story that I would like to share with you, is not so much about the volcanic eruption, as it is about the new-to-science beetle species that I secured in my pocket, in those critical moments before our research team had to evacuate from the area. The Philippines are a hotspot of biodiversity, but over 90% of their primary rainforest has been destroyed. The protected areas mostly cover the mountain tops and are nearly impossible for westerners to approach, due to the complex bureaucracy with regard to collecting permits. This lecture is an account of the “mission impossible” from the perspective of one entomologist.


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