Posted on December 18, 2019 by Sydney Tancowny

The history of how our ancestors belonged in society influences how we understand our racial identity today. We learn how to act, think or speak through ancestral stories, rituals and ideals. Therefore, we can discover how—across generations—our ancestors taught us about our identity through our mother tongue. By naming things, people or ideas in a …

The history of how our ancestors belonged in society influences how we understand our racial identity today. We learn how to act, think or speak through ancestral stories, rituals and ideals. Therefore, we can discover how—across generations—our ancestors taught us about our identity through our mother tongue. By naming things, people or ideas in a specific language, we initiate and sustain our ancestral belonging as a way of making our ancestral lifeworld unique and precious. The n* word is, for a Black person, a violent act that desecrates their human dignity through knowing their ancestor’s history of dehumanization—dehumanization that they still go through. To discover new ways of combating racism, we must move away from using the same Eurocentric viewpoints that created racism in the first place. In this Lunch & Learn, we invite you on a journey of unraveling racial encounters through Kigandan folklore and proverbs.

Lecturer:
Feisal Kirumira
Associate Lecturer of German and PhD student (Secondary Education)


Tuesday, February 4
12 noon
Roger Epp Conference Room, Forum
Register: rsvp.augustana@ualberta.ca | 780-679-1626
FREE event
$10 lunch available upon registration. Students EAT FREE but must register.



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